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20110710
20110710
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
about afghanistan and about women's experience in the days of the taliban, and of course under u.s. policy of our engagement there. and it's a chance to really understand how our policy is playing out through the eyes of this one story, the dressmaker, khair kahn and we would like to get your calls for this is the process of making this interactive see you all for your comment by phone order. let me give you the telephone numbers. he strolled the and -- eastern and central time zone is 202-585-3885. if you live in a mountain or how many times did you travel to afghanistan? >> guest: seven times since 2005. i spent about one third of 2008 and one-third of 2009 and a big chunk of 2009 and last year i was there for the july for the kabul conference and i was there in december about seven months pregnant working on maternal health stories. >> host: that wasn't a great way to engage with the women because of common experience. now your career as a political television producer for abc. how did you make the transition from that to writing this book? >> guest: very carefully. [laughter]
action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, secretary panetta told reporters on the plane it's time to focus on defeating al qaeda once and for all. >> i think we had undermined their ablthd to conduct 9/11-type attacks. we had them on the run. >> secretary panetta met with american military officials. atia abawi is in afghanistan. good morning. bring us up to date. >> good morning. panetta's very first trip as secretary of defense to afghanistan, before he landed he brought up the situation with al qaeda. he said, quote, the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach. this is a time to go after him, especially after bin laden. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them because i do believe that, if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> panetta said that, in fact, in that information they found from bin laden's compound it points to 10 to 20 key leaders of al qaeda in different places such as pakistan, yemen, somalia and different parts of africa. but coming b
making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got from the compound including names of different key al qaeda leaders. he says this is the time to actually end the war with al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happen
takes tougher action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan as i was mentioning. panetta is meeting with american military leaders as well as afghan officials. atia abawi is in kabul, afghanistan. he's making strong remarks when it comes to al qaeda and how he wants to continue stamping them out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. that's absolutely right. on his flight from d.c. to kabul he did speak to reporter on the plane that he was on about al qaeda and said that the strategic defeat of al qaeda was within reach, pointing to the death of osama bin laden, pointing to the information that we were able to retrieve from his compound, including the names of key leaders that they'd like to go after. and he says that this is the time to go after al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> reporter: al qaeda aside, this is afghanistan. he's on
in afghanistan. >> reporter: he spent much of 2002 and 2003 near kandahar, hunting for taliban. he came back to harvard, but in 2009, with the national guard unit, he went back to afghanistan. >> and so i spent a lot of time with route clearance units looking for ieds and we got hit several times and vehicles in front of me blown up. my vehicle never got hit. i was very lucky. when you run up there and pull open the door of that mwrap and see your injured buddies you never forget that sight. >> reporter: this time back home he began to explore the science of brain injury. >> what happens when the brain gets hit by a blast wave and slams up against the inside of the skull. >> reporter: with colleagues at northeastern university parker built new tools to study how a blast affects the brain. it could be years before this leads to new treatments but parker hopes eventually will have a broad impact. >> concussions that your favorite football player suffers or the head injury you get when you're in a car accident and your head snaps forward or shaken baby syndrome, these are all examples of nonpen
to fight militants more effectively and to stop elements of pakistan's military from backing the taliban in afghanistan. all of this, one more sign of the growing tensions between the u.s. and pakistan. >>> as all of this debate over spending plays out in washington, in towns across this untry, millimeters of americans just want to find a job. tonight, another stunning number behind the new and rising unemployment figures. it now takes ten months to find a job, the longest ever. millions of americans now have only food stamps to get by, and those benefits kick in once a month and midnight. and it's created a new shopper in this country. the familying heading out in darkness to get their food. here's abc's steve osunsami. >> reporter: we responsibility more than a month following leslie benson and her family. she was laid off from her job two years ago. her unemployment has run out. and the state gives her just $97 in food stamps each month to feed her family of three. >> we live for that last day of the month so we can restock and replenish. >> reporter: we gave them a camera to show us
the various elements of the taliban and others. but of course in the conflict of building, helping, developing projects going on designed to do one big strategic thing wherever you look in the middle east and that is to shore up the strength and responsiveness of the state's wherever we look whether it's iraq or afghanistan to prevent pakistan from continuing to fail, the idea of the two-stage solution for israel and palestine or all within the concept of the system and if we don't have strong response things are going in the wrong direction. >> host: what i see on the ground and a travel to afghanistan is to be honest with all the power of the u.s. military you have an incredibly confident will lead military. in the and that's not enough to substitute for the government's of the afghan states and institutions provide and and pushing we just never quite get there. it's hard to find anybody -- >> guest: that's true, too. this brings us back to something like democratization and the culture in their view is going to be something where the people will have a way if you change those that are going
.s. troops they shouldn't be too dramatic or swift to withdraw before al qaeda and taliban are defeated. >> christiane, i appreciate your analysis. i want to remind everybody, be sure to watch christiane a little later this morning on "this week." she has an exclusive interview with white house chief of staff bill daley. bianna, over to you. >>> not too far from here at rancho mirage, california, preparations are under way for the funeral of former first lady betty ford. family and friends will gather tuesday for a celebration of life service. barbara pinto has more on the nation saying good-bye to a brave and beloved woman who touched so many lives. >> r rorter: her candor and courage touched the nation. and now we know more how betty ford's family will pay tribute. >> people in america and across the world, they are going to say good-bye and they want to pay tribute to her. and private services in n public california and michigan. mrs. ford, who died of natural causus friday at age 93, will first be remembered in a private service tuesday in palm desert, california, near where she and
over this month and, panetta said he hoped to drive the taliban to peace talks during the period when u.s. force draw down and is key they keep the pressure up now so there is a chance of some kind of reconciliation in the country. back to you, jamie. >> jamie: thanks so much, david. >> eric: so is secretary panetta's assessment of al qaeda on target or is the install installed pentagon chief possibly speaking too early? for more, let's bring in fox news contributor and former ambassador totty nations, john bolton, who joins us this morning from jerusalem. good morning, ambassador. >> good morning, glad to be here. >> eric: panetta's prediction sounds awfully optimistic. you hope he's right. we got bin laden. does that mean in your view we can actually finish off al qaeda, once and for all? >> well, you know, this is almost 180° switch for the administration. president obama had told us for some time that those old-fashioned concepts of victory and defeat were really outmoded and we need to think about success, rather than victory. now, we have secretary panetta, saying that merely by
the taliban to peace talk in the period when the u.s. forces draw down. it is key to keep pressure up now to give the country a chance of some reconciliation. speaking in capped har, the new defense chief said the focus of the trip is the handover of security to afghan forces. he acknowledged that the remain, "a lot more work to do in terms of being able to transition the responsibility to them." now that leon panetta has moved to iraq, his focus will be on the situation there and concerns as he said here about iranian weapons smuggling. after all, 15 u.s. troops were killed there last month. back to you. >> shannon: all right, david. thank you very much. crews in india are scrambling through wreckage at this hour, desperately searching for survivors of a deadly train crash. more than 100 people were hurt and at least 31 killed when this express train derailed near the city of luknow. the death toll has been rising all morning long. the train was heading to new delhi from calcutta when officials say 12 cars skidded off the tracks. ♪ ♪ >> shannon: much of the debate over reigning in th
the pakistanis for some of the troops they sent to the border to combat al qaeda and the taliban. then there's also a lot of equipment that the u.s. can't get to pakistan if pakistan won't allow its personnel on the ground. because that aid and the personnel come as a package deal. >> okay. now you know there's less aid going to pakistan. you have to wonder what kind of trust or eroded trust might there be now between pakistan and the u.s. to work together from here on out? >> it's really bad. there's been a lot of tit for tat after that raid on bin laden. then the pakistanis threw out the american trainers denying the visas. now the u.s. is withholding aid. you've got to wonder, as you said, what is this going to mean, this continued tit for tat? in the past in previous years when the u.s. has withheld aid, it's been very bad. you've seen a lot of drone strikes against pakistan without pakistani cooperation. sometimes they do cooperate. but now i think you're going to see a lot of the u.s. kind of going it alone as it sends a message to pakistan as it did after 9/11. you're either with us o
service, the isi come has close ties to the former current and the velte fund and start the taliban back in afghanistan and they started the ltte. the people would give the attacks in india as a counterweight to the military power. all those groups of operational connections now and the experts would be and are inclined to plan operations against the west both at home and abroad, so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal and how much would someone get a nuclear complex there's several ways. you could of the clandestine sale of materials which a.q., the father of the program for a number of years you could have a rogue officer take over the nuclear installation work you could have my scenario where the transit from the secured facilities to the front lines and the nuclear alert because that's where it's most vulnerable. so you have a combination of weapons, the country which is hostile, the security service which has ties to the jihadists and a lot of them have been indulged by the establishment and the security, and you have something that is a worry and i woul
the taliban to peace talks when the u.s. forces drawdown. it's key to keep the pressure up to give the country a chance of some kind of reconciliation. and speaking in kandahar, he said the focus of the trip is the handover of security to afghan forces but he acknowledged there remain, quote, a lot more work to do in materials of being able to transition the responsibility to them. afghan forces now number around 300,000 but very few of their units can act independently. back to you, gregg. >> gregg: david piper, thank you. >> heather: space shuttle atlantis linking up with the international space station important the last time. the final dock go to the orbital out post by a shuttle. it will retire after the flight. the last of the 30-year shuttle program. on its final journey, they arrived bearing gifts, four tons of supplies including clothing and food. >> america's brush with royalty coming to a close, duke and duchess wrapping up a tour in southern california. one of their final stops skid row arts school for kids of all ages. casey stegall is live in los angeles with more. explain the pu
to former current jihadists. they help to find and the taliban to fight the russians. back in afghanistan. they fought and started the people he did the mumbai attacks in india. as a counterweight to india military power. all those groups have operational connections to each other now. the experts believe that they would be, and are inclined to plan operations against the west, both at home and abroad. so the question becomes then how vulnerable is the pakistani arsenal? how might someone need a nuclear bomb? there's several ways. you could have a rogue officer come you have a clandestine sale of materials which a.q. khan, the father of the nuclear program of pakistan before a number of years. you have a rogue officer taking over nuclear installation, or you can have my scenario where a bomb in transit from its secure facility the front lines in a nuclear, storm because that's where it's most one of the. you're the combination of weapons, a country which is hostile, a security service which has ties to jihadists. jihadists have been indulged on the establishment military and security, and
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)